District Initiatives

Springs Preserve

The Water District is steward to the Las Vegas Springs Preserve, the historical home of Las Vegas' founding natural water springs.

Commonly known as the "birthplace of Las Vegas," the Springs Preserve is a 180-acre cultural institution designed to commemorate Las Vegas' dynamic history and to provide a vision for a sustainable future.

The site served as the original source of water for Native Americans living here thousands of years ago. In 1997, the Las Vegas Valley Water District Board of Directors approved a plan to develop a preserve to protect and manage the cultural, natural and water resources of the site, and the Springs Preserve opened to the public in June 2007.

Featuring museums, galleries, outdoor events, a colorful botanical garden and an interpretive trail system, the Springs Preserve has evolved into a world-class attraction providing a glimpse of the origins of Las Vegas. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places and recognized by the North American Plant Collection Consortium, the Springs Preserve houses some of the region’s most sensitive archaeological, biological and natural resources.


Water Start Program

WaterStart is a partnership between the Southern Nevada Water Authority, the Las Vegas Valley Water District, the Nevada Governor’s office and private industry to foster economic growth in the water industry, encourage water innovation and contribute solutions to some of the world’s most pressing water problems.

As a WaterStart partner, the Water District is field-testing and actively using emerging technologies to improve water efficiency and system operations.

Examples of these efforts are the Water District’s use of acoustic technology from Echologics to help detect potential leaks in the early stages that allow the utility to proactively plan for future repairs or replacement without the need for service interruptions.

Additionally, Syrinix, a leader in providing intelligent pipeline monitoring, has deployed and tested its PipeMinder systems at 10 locations throughout the Las Vegas Valley. Data from the Syrinix system allows the Water District to modify system operations and eliminate these pressure changes, extending the life of the community’s underground water infrastructure.

While some technologies are helping ensure the longevity of water infrastructure, other companies such as RedEye provide utilities with efficient management tools. Recognizing that LVVWD maintains hundreds-of-thousands of engineering records, RedEye is providing LVVWD with a platform that allows these critical records to be accessed in the field, updated in real-time via mobile devices, and managed to ensure consistency and accessibility.